Podcast 2 at MoodleMayhem: @Moodlefairy

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Miguel Guhlin (@mguhlin) and Dianna Benner (@diben) recently interviewed Mary Cooch (@Moodlefairy) as the second installment of MoodleMayhem’s Moodle Podcast series.

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The goal of the podcast was “Sharing Moodle Wisdom: Grades 7-14 Year Olds”; you can find the post at http://bit.ly/mmpmcooch.  Interesting fact: Mary uses a sample student in all of her training and courses named Johnny Depp ;).

Have a listen and be sure to join the MoodleMayhem email group (which is constitutes a few emails a week, quick and easy Moodle sounding board and great community support and information).

The power of Moodle is telling when you learn that Mary was only introduced to learning management systems in 2006.  Since she’s gone on to author a book highlighting the use of Moodle for 7-14 year old students and now works to train other teachers in the UK on the effective use of Moodle in the classroom.  During the interview, Mary mentions that one of the biggest hurdle in training teachers is the common misperception that Moodle should host all Word, PowerPoint and other lesson planning documents and forms that were once printed out for students.  The value of Moodle, she says, is that you can simply type into Moodle (creating simpler resources than the once MS based files used on a daily basis).  If you have a limited training time with teachers, she focuses on the forum, composing a webpage, choice and just a few other simple Moodle tools.

Another value: Time saving.  Self-marking quizzes and editing documents in the future is a snap (as long as teachers take the time to create their resources using the correct tools within Moodle from the onset.

At about the 15 minute mark Mary comments on the contemporary discussions that Moodle is becoming obsolete and that schools should move more to the “cloud” (it’s my opinion that Moodle largely is already in the cloud, after all it is web-based).  It’s an interesting discussion which is perhaps part of a much longer discourse.

All in all, the podcast is well worth the listen.  It runs about 45 minutes but it’s full of great info (read the planning doc for a full list of the questions that are covered)

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